Medieval Unicode Font Initiative


A proposal for subranges within the Private Use Area of Unicode:
Supplements to the Latin alphabet for Medieval texts

 

Subrange 5. Ligatures: E400 - E4FF

Ligatures are two base line characters which are joined so that they form a new, composite base line character. Some consist of two identical characters, e.g. "a+a", others of different characters, e.g. "a+v". In Medieval Nordic manuscripts, ligatures may be used to denote length, "a+a", diphthong, "a+v", or a distinct vowel quality, often mutation (Umlaut), "a+v". Although it may be difficult to draw the line in many cases, it is recommended that only ligatures which may reflect a distinct phonological value should be recognised as characters of their own. - Finally, the broken characters "l" and "t" representing "ll" and "tt" respectively, should be seen as ligatures of two stems, broken in the middle. (On the other hand, "w" is interpreted and encoded as an individual character, not as a ligature of two "u" or "v" characters. By the same reasoning, Greek "o mega" is treated as an individual character, not as a combination of two short "o micron".)

Unicode 3.2 does not recognise ligatures in the Latin alphabet as base characters. The only exceptions are "æ", "œ" and "ij" (not used in Nordic). For "æ" see the Unicode range Latin-1 Supplement, and for "œ" Latin Extended-A. Other ligatures must be defined in the Private Use Area.

Glyph

Entity

Unicode

Descriptive name

&aalig;

E400

LATIN SMALL LIGATURE AA

&AAlig;

0000

LATIN CAPITAL LIGATURE AA

&aolig;

0000

LATIN SMALL LIGATURE AO

&AOlig;

0000

LATIN CAPITAL LIGATURE AO

&aulig;

0000

LATIN SMALL LIGATURE AU

&AUlig;

0000

LATIN CAPITAL LIGATURE AU

&avlig;

0000

LATIN SMALL LIGATURE AV

&AVlig;

0000

LATIN CAPITAL LIGATURE AV

&aylig;

0000

LATIN SMALL LIGATURE AY

&AYlig;

0000

LATIN CAPITAL LIGATURE AY

&oolig;

0000

LATIN SMALL LIGATURE OO

&OOlig;

0000

LATIN CAPITAL LIGATURE OO

&vylig;

0000

LATIN SMALL LIGATURE VY

&lbrk;

0000

LATIN SMALL LETTER BROKEN L

⎴

0000

LATIN SMALL LETTER BROKEN T


Version 1.0, 15 June 2002 OEH